Five Things to Consider When Choosing a Wrestling Camp

It’s that time of year – the season is winding down and wrestlers and teams are focusing on making state tournament runs. For others, such as youth wrestlers or junior high wrestlers, they are starting to turn their focus towards offseason training programs and starting to look into wrestling camp options.

As a young wrestler, what should you look for when choosing a wrestling camp? As the parent of a wrestler, what questions should you ask when choosing a wrestling camp? There are a number of factors that come into play. They include:

1. Type of camp: Is it a team camp, intensive camp, technique camp? You want to find a camp that fits your wrestlers individual needs. What your wrestler may need to work on could be different than the other kids in your youth club or on your high school team.

2. Workout partners available at the camp: If you go to a camp where you won’t be challenged, you may not reap any benefits. You can drill all you want, but if you are going against competition that is inferior, it won’t help you. Likewise, if you are a new wrestler and go against elite-level talent with much more experience, your wrestler could struggle, get frustrated and not enjoy the camp. And, possibly no longer enjoy wrestling.

3. Location of the camp: Is your wrestler ready to go out of state and stay away from home for a week? Or, would a day camp, where they commute back home every night be the best for your camper? Would two or three days be enough for your young wrestlers attention span? These things need to be considered and are different for every wrestler out there.

4. Cost of the camp: The cost of a camp is a big factor in the camp kids attend. Find one that fits your budget. If you can’t afford a big name camp – look for local camps that provide similar opportunities.  There is a camp out there for everyone – and you don’t have to break the bank!

5. Clinicians/staff: It’s great to be at a camp that has big name staff – J Robinson, Tom Brands, John Smith, Cael Sanderson, Dan Gable – to name a few. But keep in mind, while these legends of the sport headline the camp, many wrestlers will be working with support staff that includes college wrestlers from the team where you are attending camp. It can be a great chance to meet and work with today’s college stars. Ask what the wrestler-to-camper ratio is, how much involvement these staffers have and how they will work with your wrestler. Many truly do love working and teaching kids, and working with these coaches and wrestlers can be a major motivator for young wrestlers.

However, today’s youth wrestler can also learn and train from the many other great teachers out there from the youth clubs, high school and small college teams. A big name is great – but there are a number of great teachers and coaches out there – find one that fits your wrestler the best.

There is more detailed information and advice like this from over 40 high school and college wrestling coaches, Olympians, NCAA All-Americans, parents and more available in The Ultimate Guide to Wrestling Camps.

Order your copy today – train like a champion – and save money doing so – tomorrow.

This entry was posted in News and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.